Top 10 Most Popular Posts. Ever.

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Image via Wikipedia

Here they are.  They certainly are a varied bunch (everything from fishing to sins to target practice, well sort of).

What Every Marketer Can Learn From Fishermen

Are You Reading These Blogs?

102 Great Headlines

Announcing a Painless Way to Stretch Your Marketing Dollars

A Marketing Mistake You Should Never Make

Is Your Marketing Missing Its Target?

Secrets of Successful Email Newsletters

What a Giant Squid Can Teach the New York Times About Publishing

How to Write Headlines Your Readers Can’t Resist

7 Deadly Web Copy Mistakes

Actually, this gives me an idea.  Stay tuned for tomorrow’s post (your input needed).

OOPS:  Thought I posted this hours ago.  Apparently I never hit publish!

Is Your Marketing Like Blockbuster Video?

DVDs of The Twilight Saga: New Moon at Costco ...

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Blockbuster has just filed for bankruptcy protection. The store near me closed long ago. I’ve been happily using Netflix instead.

Blockbuster’s big mistake

They tried to appeal to everyone – or maybe nobody. I’d go in for a movie and would see 20 copies of cartoons and Adam Sandler’s latest (now, it would probably be Twilight movies).  Maybe a few classics. That was about it. Rotten selection, high fees, limited viewing time – it was hard, expensive, and unpleasant.

Netflix is easy

Netflix, on the other hand, is easy. They have a large selection, you can keep movies as long as you like, and now, even watch them over the Internet (instant gratification). Netflix works because they took a model that was broken (video rental) and made it sleek, easy, and rewarding.

Look at some of your own practices.  Are you marketing to everyone or marketing to your tribe? Are you a eierlegendewollmilchsau?

Are you making it hard for your clients? Could be that you tend to use email when your clients prefer the phone. Or requiring too many steps to enter your blog contest? Or maybe your newsletter sign-up is confusing.

Go take a look. Let me know what you found.

Could Your Marketing Be Like Root Canal?

old dental chair

A firm that markets to dentists sent a friend of mine the following email on Facebook:

New Patients from Facebook?

On Facebook:

• There are more than 500 million potential patients.

• You can target your patients by location and age.

• You can test and use what works.

• You set the daily budget you are comfortable with.

More info here (then it gives contact details)

Talking to the wrong people

Really? 500 million. Gee, my friend is gonna need a bigger office!

But seriously, this makes no sense. Does anyone go to Facebook looking for a dentist? No. When you need a dentist, and don’t know one, you ask your friends.

And how is my friend supposed to fill cavities for people who live 100 or 200 or 3000 miles away? Has this firm invented the virtual dentist?

Interruption, not permission

My dentist friend doesn’t want these emails. Yet, the company sending them doesn’t care (and I guess Facebook doesn’t either).

He, (and anyone else wanting to grow their business, is much better off using permission marketing to build a fan base of people who WANT to hear from him.

Numbers instead of niches

It doesn’t matter how many people are on Facebook. Numbers don’t matter. What does matter is reaching people who actually need/want your services, and who you can help. You cannot clean someone’s teeth if they’re in London and you’re in Philadelphia. You want to reach the right people, not just any people.  You can’t make money selling water skis to a list of 1,000,000 people who live in the desert.

Marketing like this is painful – both for you and your potential clients.  You won’t make money, and they’ll get mad at you (instead of wanting to do business with you).  Kinda like root canal (which, thankfully, I’ve never had).

Share your thoughts

Have you tried Facebook marketing?  What happened? Have you gotten any silly emails like my friend did?

Image: Wikimedia

Do You Make This Common Marketing Mistake?

mistake

You carefully set up your online marketing campaign, selected “your people“, offered solutions to their problems, designed eye-catching graphics, and sent it out into the world.

And it went splat.

What happened?

You missed an important step.

When you create an online campaign, there are three places you can send people.

Home pages

Your home page is the “front page” of your web site.  The door where most people enter your site.  Check your stats; it’s probably got more visits than the other pages.  It’s great as a general introduction to what you do and to invite people to explore your site further (here’s mine).

It’s not so good as a direct sales tool.

Product pages

Then there’s a product page.  That’s a page that’s talking about a specific product or service you offer.  It can be a selling page, or informational (like this one on Amazon).  This is better as a sales tool, and but there’s a better choice (especially for services).

Landing pages

Finally, there’s a landing page.  The landing page is a special page (or sometimes a mini-site) set up to sell something, encourage sign ups (to a newsletter), or encourage visitors to download information (here’s my newsletter sign-up page, as an example).

Landing pages have fewer navigation buttons, so that visitors concentrate on what’s in front of them (and don’t wander off elsewhere on your site).  The goal is for visitors to arrive, read what you have to say, and take action right there.

There’s a fierce debate on the web about long vs. short copy, but landing pages tend to be long in order to answer questions and explain everything about the product (since you can’t do that in person).

When you run a campaign, send people to a landing page.  Tell them what they need to know to buy your product.  Don’t distract them.  Get more sales!

Image:  jyri